Monthly Archives

March 2020

Online Technology

LOK JACK GSB IMMEDIATELY TRANSITIONS TO ONLINE OPERATIONS AMID COVID-19

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Online Technology

The UWI-Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business (Lok Jack GSB) continues to be resilient during the COVID-19 outbreak. Effective on March 14, 2020, after the announcement by Prime Minister Dr. the Hon. Keith Rowley to close all places of learning, the Business School immediately activated its IT infrastructure to facilitate the transition of face-to-face classes to online for all students and Executive Education participants and actioned its remote access policy for staff, which allows employees and faculty to effectively work from home.

The health and safety of Lok Jack GSB’s employees, faculty, students and other stakeholders are of paramount importance. As such, the Business School ensured that it acted swiftly to prevent the continued spread of the COVID-19 and eliminated the possibility of any disruption to our services and the learning process of our students.

The technology being used by staff, which includes VPN access with Softphone (Avaya One-X), allows our stakeholders, to stay connected to the Business School. We remain easily accessible through our individual work emails and extensions, and via these general channels:

We ask persons to refer to our website and social media platforms for frequent updates on the school’s activities.  These channels will be used to provide up-to-date information as it becomes available.

We take this opportunity to thank specially the IT and METS staff for having the infrastructure ready and to all staff and students for their positive response to the shift in operations, as we join the global effort to preserve our safety and well-being.

We thank you for your continued support and urge you to stay abreast of the guidance from the World Health Organisation (WHO) and Ministry of Health.

Lok Jack GSB

About us: The Arthur Lok Jack Global School of Business was established in 1989 as a joint venture between The University of the West Indies and the private sector of Trinidad and Tobago to provide postgraduate education in business and management. Today, Lok Jack GSB is recognised as the premier institution for the provision of business and management education, training and consultancy services in Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean region. The motto Innovatus Ars Ducendi, means Innovating the Art of Leadership.

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International Guest Lecturers for Self-Awareness and Leadership course for Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business

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Students of the Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business Cohort 2 got the opportunity to gain insights and engage with guests lecturers; Dr. Jo-Ann Flett, Organizational Consultant at Partners Worldwide,  Wayne, Pennsylvania, Fulbright Visiting Faculty and      Ms. Maria C Horning, Program Director, Geneva Global, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They covered content on Self-awareness and Leadership.

Learn more on BISB here: https://bit.ly/39Zcv7Q

 

 

Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business Service-Learning Project at Edinburgh Special Needs Centre

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As part of the curriculum for the Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business programme, students have to partake in socially responsible activities. Cohort one had the opportunity to interact with members of the Edinburgh Special Needs Centre. 

They got a chance to engage with the students through games and certain subject areas. One of the students who volunteered stated: “Whether someone is disabled or not, each child has a purpose in life and also a talent in this school such as Terence, who is a great singer or my brother who enjoys football and cricket. Each person develops a certain skill and ability that gives them a purpose to lead a happy life.”

Another student’s feedback was, “this created leadership development for the community. I would always remember teaching this young boy, Terrance, an amazing singer and great at Maths. I taught him how to read, understand and then attempt fractions and number questions.”

Stay tuned for more insights on the Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business. 

BISB Student visit to Cocoa Estate

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Students of the Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business programme (BISB), Jeroam DesVignes, Maryanna Samuel and Navindra Jaggernauth volunteered at the Ortinola Great House on November 24th, 2019.

These students are also ambassadors of the BISB programme, they assisted students from Semester at Sea as they experienced the chocolate making tour. Special thanks to Nikita from Ortinola Estates Ltd and lecturer Tobias Frenking.

Do you want to be a part of this experience? Learn more about the Bachelor of International and Sustainable Business 

FAQs for COVID-19

COVID-19 – Frequently Asked Questions

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The responses to the following frequently asked questions contain useful information issued by the World Health Organization and is intended to inform about COVID-19. The UWI, CARPHA, WHO, and Ministries of Health across the region are all reliable sources of information regarding COVID-19.

What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is the infectious disease caused by the most recently discovered coronavirus. This new virus and disease were unknown before the outbreak began in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhoea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don’t feel unwell.

Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. About 2% of people with the disease have died. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

How is COVID-19 spread?

People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs, sneezes or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch COVID-19 by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-19 if they breathe in droplets from a person with COVID-19 who coughs out or exhales droplets. This is why it is important to stay more than 1 metre (3 feet) away from a person who shows flu-like symptoms.

Should I wear a mask?

People with no respiratory symptoms, such as the cough, do not need to wear a medical mask. WHO recommends the use of masks for people who have symptoms of COVID-19 and for those caring for individuals who have symptoms, such as cough and fever. The use of masks is crucial for health workers and people who are taking care of someone (at home or in a health care facility).

The most effective ways to protect yourself and others against COVID-19 are to frequently clean your hands, cover your cough with the bend of elbow or tissue (which should be discarded immediately), and maintain a distance of at least 1 metre (3 feet) from people who are coughing or sneezing.

Some World Health Organization (WHO) tips for minimising risk (this will be accompanied by pictures):

  • Clean hands reduces risk. Wash/Clean your hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol-based hand rubs (minimum 60% of alcohol).
  • Avoid touching your face.
  • Clean/sanitise your work areas with disinfectants regularly (desks etc.).
  • Keep yourself informed from reliable sources and avoid the spread of false information. (Reliable sources include The UWI, CARPHA, WHO, Ministries of Health).
  • Avoid travelling if you have a fever and cough; seek medical attention if required.
  • Manage your coughs and sneezes. Cough or sneeze into your sleeve or a tissue. Dispose of tissues immediately and wash/clean your hands.
  • The elderly or persons with cardiovascular disease, diabetes or respiratory conditions should avoid crowded places.
  • If you have fever and are coughing or sneezing, seek medical attention and stay at home.
  • If you are sick and are at home, sleep separately from other family members, use different cutlery and utensils.
  • If you develop shortness of breath, seek medical attention immediately.

For a safe and healthy environment,

LOK JACK GSB Leadership Team.

Sources: World Health Organisation (WHO)  and Caribbean Public Health Agency

Lok Jack GSB Action Plan

NOVEL Corona Virus (COVID-19) Information for The UWI-Lok Jack GSB Community

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The rapid spread of the COVID-19 virus requires that all organisations put mitigation measures in place. With one confirmed case of the Corona virus in Trinidad and Tobago to date, the health and safety of our community is a priority for the Lok Jack GSB.

It is important that we provide you with the necessary information about the steps we are taking to ensure our compliance with the high standards of sanitation required at our facilities. We also wish to share the School’s plans to ensure continuity of classes and programmes in the event of individuals, groups or country-wide quarantine.

The Lok Jack GSB’s leadership is working closely with the University of the West Indies (UWI), government and public health agencies and continues to follow guidelines from the relevant authorities including the World Health Organization (WHO), the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) and the Ministry of Health.

We are committed to adopting all measures necessary to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. We will also ensure you are kept informed of significant new developments and will share information pertinent to our community, as it arises.

As you may be aware, on February 28, 2020, WHO epidemiologists increased the assessment of the risk of spread and the risk of impact of COVID-19 to very high at a global level. CARPHA subsequently upgraded the threat assessment from the Caribbean region from low to moderate to high.  

The Lok Jack GSB Plan

The Plan outlined below addresses the actions taken by the School and contingencies that will be put in place.

  1. The Lok Jack GSB has established a Working Group and is liaising with the Special COVID-19 Task Forceput in place by the University of the West Indies (UWI). The UWI’s Task Force is chaired by Professor Clive Landis, Pro Vice-Chancellor for Undergraduate Studies and former Director of the George Alleyne Chronic Disease Research Centre, who has considerable experience in the field of Caribbean public health.
  2. Upgraded cleaning and sanitising protocols to those applied in hospitals and airports with respect to use of cleaners and frequency of sanitization.

  • Frequently used surfaces areas will be cleaned and sanitised 3 times a day.
  • Disinfectant such as ethyl or isopropyl alcohol [70-90%], household bleach diluted, or hydrogen peroxide will be used for sanitisation.
  • Chemicals used are Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] – registered.
  1. Hand Sanitisers placed at strategic locations throughout the Campus
  • Reception
  • Student Administration Unit (Lobby Area and Cashier)
  • Outside Student Washrooms (ground floor)
  • Outside Student Washrooms (first floor)
  • Restaurant
  • Library
  1. Providing online access to students presenting flu-like symptoms

Protective Measures Against COVID-19

According to the World Health Organization, the following are basic protective measure against the new coronavirus:

  1. Wash your hands frequently
    • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water.
  2. Maintain social distancing
    • Maintain at least 1 metre (3 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.
  3. Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth
    • Why? Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.
  4. Practice respiratory hygiene
    • This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately.
  5. If you have fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical care early
    • Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention and call in advance. 
  6. Stay informed and follow the advice given by your healthcare provider

Please note that we will provide you with relevant information as it becomes available, while we continue to be guided by the directives from the University of the West Indies (UWI), Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education.

For any specific questions, please free to send them to info@lokjackgsb.edu.tt

Convergence of ERM, Future Credit ratings and the Corona Virus

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Ken Hackshaw, Enterprise Risk Management lecturer would like to proffer a prediction of sorts:

Given the Covid-19 outbreak and its impact on the global stock market, the global supply chain, health industry, airline industry etc. The role and value of Enterprise Risk Management will see a significant increase in use and applicability. Regulators therefore, will also increase its oversight, relevance and dependence on ERM. Additionally, international credit rating agencies, as part of its international rating criteria/methodology will put greater emphasis on the effectiveness of ERM at private and government agencies.

This prediction is predicated on the following:

  • post the financial crisis of 2008/2009, we saw a ramping up of the use and importance of risk management disciplines across the financial services industry.
  • The value of risk culture building and disaster preparedness after the Deepwater Horizon oil spills and other major disasters.
  • The role of Business Continuity planning after the Fukushima volcano and subsequent tsunami

That being said, we at the Trinidad and Tobago Risk Management Institute (TTRMI) have been preaching from the mountain tops about being proactive and anticipatory: about future proofing your business: about doing Horizon scanning to identify emerging risk and about improving the risk culture of your organization and yes about Business Continuity planning.

One may argue that Covid-19 outbreak is like a black swan, no one anticipated this risk event, and that maybe true but we  would have said many times: Risk management is a force multiplier and can be viewed as being similar to the the airbag in your vehicle, it will not prevent the accident from occurring but it will reduce the impact WHEN, not if, accidents occur.  I therefore agree that this risk of Covid-19 could not be planned for but I submit that institutions that had/have a robust and integrated ERM program will fear better than those who had nothing.

Currently many organizations in Trinidad and Tobago and elsewhere, are scrambling to put “things in place” as a result of the covid-19 outbreak, when they should have been “implementing contingency plans.” This would have been accomplished as part of the business impact analysis they would have conducted many moons ago, and as part of the risk assessments they would recently conducted or updated.

 

While strong risk management practises can’t stop the spread of Covid-19 or prevent other pandemic risk events, enterprise risk management processes can help organizations anticipate the impact of these kinds of unforeseen, extraordinary events.   

Note the following:

While ERM is not a new concept, its increasing influence on ratings and regulations cannot be ignored. As the methodologies employed by rating agencies and the reporting requirements set by regulators become more prospective in nature, ERM analysis as a leading indicator of a firm’s ability to operate within a controlled risk/reward framework becomes that much more influential on how a company is rated or regulated. 

 

We are living in a new VUCA world, of which Volatility and Uncertainty (V&U) will bring the most risks.

For more information on Enterprise Risk Management, Contact Umesh Sookoo at 299-0218 ext. 367 or email: u.sookoo@lokjackgsb.edu.tt

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